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Muriel Rukeyser, introductory remarks

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In her opening remarks, poet Muriel Rukeyser asks her audience to raise their hands if they have ever written a poem. We hear a murmur and bits of laughter and, presumably, hands are raised. She thanks them, explaining that she has begun asking every audience this question and that “there’s always the moment of silence, and looking around first, and generally, quite slowly, almost all the hands go up.” Before reading a single poem, she manages to create a community of listeners and of poets. As Jane Malcolm has argued, if Rukeyser’s goal is “to occupy the room with poetry,” then, even without knowing how many raised their hands, “we are now listening to a collective, to one mere poet in a room of poets.” We start to hear the room as collectively invested in the questions of what a poetry reading is and why poetry readings as live events are worth seeking out – questions that we may also ask ourselves while seeking out and listening to these recordings today.

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Maxine Gadd reading “Shore Animals” with improvised flute by Richard Sommer

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After reading for about 45 minutes, BC poet Maxine Gadd invites host Richard Sommer to improvise on her flute to the poem “Shore Animals.” Starting with the negotiation between Gadd and Sommer about what to read and how to perform together, a process that constitutes its own audible improvisation, this clip includes the first two minutes of a six-minute improvisation, which ends with a crescendo into a raucous shout. Their improvisation is a singular moment when an audience member formally performs in the SGW Poetry Series. Though, at the same time, this recording reminds listeners that the audience is always present – ready to improvise, interject, and even interrupt – and that the audience is also what we are listening to as archival listeners.

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Call for Research Creation Proposals

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SpokenWeb is inviting Concordia students to submit a proposal for a research creation project to be presented at Performing Technology on November 14, 2019.  Presented by SpokenWeb, Performing Technology will be a two-part event with performances and a panel discussion. It will be an investigation into the electroacoustic tools and methods that poets and sound-artists use to manipulate and create […]

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Margaret Atwood introducing and reading “This is a Photograph of Me”

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The last Audio of the Week featured Roy Kiyooka introducing Phyllis Webb and explaining what the SGW (Sir George Williams) Poetry Series attempted to achieve through its programming of Canadian and American poets from 1966-1974. In this week’s audio clip, Atwood first explains the illness haunting her voice and then starts her reading with the ghostly poem, “This is a Photograph of Me,” also the first poem in The Circle Game (1966). Despite its matter-of-fact title, this poem presents not a clear picture but rather a blurred trace of a haunted voice: “The photograph was taken / the day after I drowned.” Before her rise to celebrity (evident when Atwood reads again at SWGU in 1974), here is Atwood in 1967, at the start of her career, telling the reader and listener that this photograph-as-poem is a representation of me. But who is speaking? Listen closely, and “eventually / you will be able to see me.”

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Podcast Project Manager / Producer Position — Aug 28, 2019

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The SpokenWeb Podcast Project Manager and Producer will support the planning for and production of ~10 podcasts, featuring the SoundBox Collection audio recordings aimed at increasing the profile of SpokenWeb UBCO, a member of the SSHRC-funded research-library-community partnership. This position will liaise and work collaboratively with the central SpokenWeb podcasting production team at Simon Fraser […]

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